Wildflowers at Our Kitchener Garden Centre

A wildflower is defined as a plant that has not been hybridized or genetically modified by any gardener or botanist. It has the capability of reproducing itself from seed, and by runners, stolons (stems that grow on or just below the ground that produce buds for new plants) or division.

Why Grow Wildflowers?

  • Wildflowers are already adapted to our climate. They’re native plants and can easily survive our cold winters and hot (sometimes very dry) summers
  • They have generally acquired a tolerance of, or a resistance to, pests and diseases
  • Native plants create a habitat or food source for wildlife, birds and insects that, in turn, are responsible for the plants’ survival by pollinating or redistributing their seed
  • Lastly – they’re beautiful!

Maintenance

Choosing native plants does not mean a maintenance – free garden but by following a few tips, they can be easy growers.

  • Adding organic matter through the use of compost or manures will help keep your plants healthy and more resistant to pests and diseases.
  • In the fall, once the flowers have gone to seed, prairie and meadow gardens should be mowed down to a height of about 10-15 cm.
  • Woodland plants should be covered with leaves in the fall.
  • The use of pesticides should be avoided at all times.
  • Avoid picking the flowers of native plants such as Jack in the Pulpit, Trilliums, wild orchids or Marsh Marigolds as they will decline in vigor.
  • Be cautious about your use of exotic native plants and noxious weeds. In some cases, noxious weeds are prohibited from being planted at all due to their extreme vigour, or poison to people or animals. If you want to learn more about noxious weeds, visit, http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/facts/noxious_weeds.htm
  • Only buy native plants from responsible companies or organizations that propagate their own (like us).
  • Do not dig up native plants.

GreenWay has a large selection of wildflower plants. Come check them out for yourself or contact us to learn more!

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